SafeGo, The only way to go?

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When it comes to giving gifts to my wife, I’ve been going in the direction of practical over cute.  We have plenty of stuff, and satisfying a need is a good way to show you are really thinking about someone… right? I decided that a matching set of SafeGo’s would be a good Valentine’s Day gift for my wife and I. Blue for me, Pink for her.

Living in Florida, we go to the beach at least twice every year. We also have passes to Aquatica and we both go on weekend trips with friends. A personal lock box is cheaper than renting a locker and in general, great to have for peace of mind. Here’s my out of the box impression:

Although the listings on Amazon clearly state that it is  7 x 4 x 7.5 inches, It felt much smaller than I expected. I considered returning them when I first opened the package and held one in my hand. But I like the design, so we kept them. The design seems very secure. The locking mechanism is metal. The locking end of the cable feels solid.

The other end of the cable is anchored using a small attachment, which is held in place with Phillips screws, and reinforced by the lid. The hinge pins are pressed in, with the inner portion of the hinge being solid, so the pins can’t be punched out. While it isn’t a metal safe, it is a lock box that you can’t break open, unless you want to attract quite a bit of attention to yourself.

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SafeGo has made it clear they are focused on protecting smartphones.

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After we had them for a month and used them, I realized a few things. First, unlike most of the other “Beach-Safes” SafeGo has the option to use keys. With a key, I can open and close my SafeGo in a crowded area and no one will see the combination. I could hand a friend the key and ask them get something out of it for me, without telling them my combination. I could even let someone borrow it. This is perfect if you’re paranoid, or if you don’t want to change your combination.

Next, The cable anchor makes a middle-hump, this blocks the the entry of some bulky items. For example, I have a set of Beats Solo headphones. I can fit the headphones in the SafeGo, if I guide them in. But I can’t get them in, if they are in their case.

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So, if you’re the type of person who wants to use the headphone opening (so you can  lounge under a cabana and listen to books on tape or playlists while napping) you’ll want to get a set of ear buds / small headphones with controls.  That way you can pause your music remotely, like when the waiter comes by and asks if you need anything from the bar. Then when you want to take a dip in the pool to cool off, you will still have room in the SafeGo for your phone and your earbuds.

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The cable is long enough to use it to secure other items as well. I doubt anyone would want to steal my cheap watch, my towel, my shoes, or my clothes… but securing them all together simply makes sure they’ll be right where I left them when I come back.

Overall, I think this is one of the best designs for a travel safe I have seen. But once again, nothing is perfect. When my wife returned from her Girls’ Cruise we found that the cable should never be left unlocked.

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The cable had worked it’s way down into the box while in her luggage.  Due to the lip of the lid, it was being held in place. Since the lid has to open over the cable, this put tension directly on the lock-portion on the cable if we tried to open the lid. It was very frustrating to get the cable back out. It only took a few minutes, but it would have been impossible to do on the beach, with wet hands and no needle nose pliers. Now that we know about this little quirk, it is completely avoidable. Never leave it unlocked, never have a problem.

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